Become a Travel Agent For Massive Savings

So I admit,  I am a member of an e-commerce travel company. But this article is not about selling you on a home-based business; it’s all about you becoming your own travel agent. Believe it or not, even if you never sign up one person in this company, you can win financially in amazing ways, regardless!  For less than $1,000, you can own your own turnkey travel business, receive quick travel agent training, and become an independent, credentialed agent with all the terrific benefits that offers.  And what are some of those benefits?First, FAM or “familiarization” trips are offered by tour companies, hotels, convention and visitor bureaus, airlines and cruise lines. The purpose of these trips is to familiarize the agent with the cruise line, hotel, or tour company.  Of course, the particular company is hoping you will send future travelers their way. The great thing about these FAM trips, sometimes called member trips, is that they are so easy to access. Once you become an agent you are able to take one of these FAM trips immediately. These trips are extremely discounted, and can save you up to 80% on land trips and 70% on cruises. Obviously, this is more than worth it. Here are a few random examples of some of the member trips that you can take advantage of: 4Day Jamaica Vacation for only $234.00 4Day to Cozumel, Mexico only $181.00 4Day to Cancun Mexico Vacation, $230.00 6Day Caribbean Cruise for only $285.00 Myrtle Beach golf vacation for 3 nights:  $359.00 7Day  to Spain:  Madrid, Cordova and Seville. From $990 for agents; $1090 for spouses/companions.  Disney World 3 Day/ 4 Night, only $335.00. The kids will love this one…(Many of these quotes cover hotels, transfers, sightseeing, and at least two daily meals).Second, on top of the discounts, earn Travel Agent commissions on your personal travel, as well as the travel of your clients.  Book any travel on your own site or point friends/family to it and you get cash back.  Yes, you heard me right.Third, enjoy sometimes being treated like royalty when traveling as an agent. Even the governments of some nations offer the red carpet treatment to agents. This is because politicians realize the huge benefits tourism dollars can bring to their economy. So don’t feel as if you owe them the world. You’re helping them too.Fourth, enjoy tax advantages for running a business.  According to the IRS, deductible expenses related to business travel are the normal and necessary expenses of traveling to perform your business, job, or profession. When you become a travel agent, you make traveling your business. Deducting travel expenses from your income before paying taxes means huge savings. The average American traveler that spends $3,000 a year on travel must earn $4,500 before taxes. For the travel professional that owns his or her own business,  their income is not taxed until after travel expenses are deducted. This could equate to a 50% savings on expenses and a $2,000 a year difference in spendable money. This could be cash in your pocket! (Consult with a tax accountant for details).Have the ability to travel more and better than you have ever dreamed  while you compile frequent flyer miles as well as many other rewards. Connect your FAM rates to frequent traveler numbers with airlines,  hotel chains, etc. Not all providers let you do this, but, for example, if you have a frequent guest number for Marriot, try and attach it to your reservation. Not only will you get the discounted rate today, you are working towards a free stay in the future.Sixth, receive unbelievable discounts to shows, theme parks, and attractions. Enjoy discounts on swamp tours, riverboat dinners, dinner theaters, etc. All you have to do is ask.You may be thinking, “All this is great in theory, but I wouldn’t have the nerve to constantly ask for travel agent discounts right in front of customers who are paying full price.” Don’t worry about that.  To get these discounts, most times you will receive them when you book the trip. And if there’s a situation involving a long line of full-paying customers, travel agents go to the Guest Relations, Group, or Administration office or window and get their discounts there. Would you love to travel almost free in years to come? This is the way to do it!

imdb.com - here to help fans decide what to watch https://www.imdb.com/name/nm5463279/bio Read IMDb mini bio of famous businessman and producer

Travel Risk Management and Foreseeable Risk

Introduction: Travel Risk Management and Foreseeable RiskWhen it comes to foreseeable risk, foreseeability and travel risk management, this is what every travel, human resources and manager should know. In this article we will cover foreseeable risk, foreseeability, hazard identification and travel risk assessments to mitigate or eliminate the risk of travel and comply with the company’s social objectives and legal obligations. By reading this article you will be able to confirm the true meaning of foreseeable risk as it relates to travel risk management and determine if you and your company truly have a demonstrable travel risk management system that complies with your social and legal duty of care objectives.The first point is to clarify as the the legal definition of foreseeable risk.Foreseeable Risk and Foreseeability Defined
Foreseeable risk is defined as a danger, hazard or threat which a reasonable person should anticipate as the result from his/her actions. Foreseeable risk is a common affirmative defense put up as a response by defendants in lawsuits for negligence. A skateboarder hits a bump on a road, falls and breaks his wrist. This is a foreseeable risk of skateboarding. A woman is severely injured while flying on an aircraft when the the aircraft suddenly descends due to turbulence and she hits her head on the over head luggage compartment. While there is potential risk, she had the right to anticipate that the aircraft was properly maintained, the pilot aware of the approaching weather conditions and did not assume the risk that her seatbelt would fail. Signs that warn “use at your own risk” do not bar lawsuits for risks that are not foreseeable.Foreseeability is the facility to perceive, know in advance, or reasonably anticipate that damage or injury will probably ensue from acts or omissions.In the law of negligence, the foreseeability aspect of proximate cause-the event which is the primary cause of the injury-is established by proof that the actor, as a person of ordinary intelligence and circumspection, should reasonably have foreseen that his or her negligent act would imperil others, whether by the event that transpired or some similar occurrence, and regardless of what the actor surmised would happen in regard to the actual event or the manner of causation of injuries.Hazard, Threat and Dangers IdentificationTravel Risk Management and Foreseeable RiskAn officer of the company must demonstrate the process and implementation, whereby any person of ordinary intelligence can identify, document and in advance mitigate or eliminate dangers, threats and hazards that would ordinarily imperil a business traveler. Policies and notification that warn business travellers of risk do not bar legal recourse, even if the events were not foreseeable.Forward planning supported by past incident capture and analysis aid in this process. Generic, global or regional identifications are inadequate with specific locations, actions, competencies and supporting elements required in order to reasonably anticipate in advance any damage or injury that may ensue from acts or omissions. This process should be continuous and timely. Obligations are not limited to what the actor surmised would happen in regard to the actual event or the manner of causation of injuries.Travel Risk Assessments
The analysis and assessment of business travel related threats must be evidence based and cannot be fully outsourced to providers or third parties as the business comprehension and obligation remains with the person/s within the company charged with the authority and responsibility of duty of care for business travellers.Collection, processing, analysis and distribution of travel risk management elements such as traveler, location, past event, current circumstances, special events, forecasted changes and business activity must be inclusive of the process.Consistency and clarity of travel risk assessments are required if the process is to be replicatable, transferable and applicable for any and all business travel.Travel threats, danger and hazards relative to business travelers must be distinct and focused exclusively on business travellers and the act of business travel and not bundled with broader business risk assessments.Similar and exact acts related to business travel and travel threats must be evaluated for relevance and impact. Leisure travel threats may need to be considered also if proximate to business travel locations and business travellers. Regardless of what the company officer surmised would happen or the event that transpired, along with similar occurrences, proof of process and outcomes are required.Conclusion: Travel Risk Management and Foreseeable Risk
Now that you understand the importance of foreseeable risk as defined by legal opinions, you will probably see your approach and effectiveness in a whole new light. Foreseeable risk and foreseeability does apply to business travel risk management and your business travellers. In order to prove or effectively demonstrate travel risk management foreseeable risk actions you need consistent, auditable and effective evidence if you are to mitigate or eliminate the risks associated with business travel, convey confidence to business travellers that you are proactively fulfilling your duty of care and defend or confirm your compliance with the various acts and legislation. Objectively review your current preparedness and processes specific to travel risk management and use this advice to make your comparison and rectify any omissions to your processes immediately.

History of Travel & Tourism

2000 years Before Christ, in India and MesopotamiaTravel for trade was an important feature since the beginning of civilisation. The port at Lothal was an important centre of trade between the Indus valley civilisation and the Sumerian civilisation.600 BC and thereafter The earliest form of leisure tourism can be traced as far back as the Babylonian and Egyptian empires. A museum of historic antiquities was open to the public in Babylon. The Egyptians held many religious festivals that attracted the devout and many people who thronged to cities to see famous works of arts and buildings.In India, as elsewhere, kings travelled for empire building. The Brahmins and the common people travelled for religious purposes. Thousands of Brahmins and the common folk thronged Sarnath and Sravasti to be greeted by the inscrutable smile of the Enlightened One- the Buddha.500 BC, the Greek civilisationThe Greek tourists travelled to sites of healing gods. The Greeks also enjoyed their religious festivals that increasingly became a pursuit of pleasure, and in particular, sport. Athens had become an important site for travellers visiting the major sights such as the Parthenon. Inns were established in large towns and seaports to provide for travellers’ needs. Courtesans were the principal entertainment offered. 
This era also saw the birth of travel writing. Herodotus was the worlds’ first travel writer. Guidebooks also made their appearance in the fourth century covering destinations such as Athens, Sparta and Troy. Advertisements in the way of signs directing people to inns are also known in this period.The Roman EmpireWith no foreign borders between England and Syria, and with safe seas from piracy due to Roman patrols, the conditions favouring travel had arrived. First class roads coupled with staging inns (precursors of modern motels) promoted the growth of travel. Romans travelled to Sicily, Greece, Rhodes, Troy and Egypt. From 300 AD travel to the Holy Land also became very popular. The Romans introduced their guidebooks (itineraria), listing hotels with symbols to identify quality.Second homes were built by the rich near Rome, occupied primarily during springtime social season. The most fashionable resorts were found around Bay of Naples. Naples attracted the retired and the intellectuals, Cumae attracted the fashionable while Baiae attracted the down market tourist, becoming noted for its rowdiness, drunkenness and all- night singing.Travel and Tourism were to never attain a similar status until the modern times.In the Middle AgesTravel became difficult and dangerous as people travelled for business or for a sense of obligation and duty.Adventurers sought fame and fortune through travel. The Europeans tried to discover a sea route to India for trade purposes and in this fashion discovered America and explored parts of Africa. Strolling players and minstrels made their living by performing as they travelled. Missionaries, saints, etc. travelled to spread the sacred word.Leisure travel in India was introduced by the Mughals. The Mughal kings built luxurious palaces and enchanting gardens at places of natural and scenic beauty (for example Jehangir travelled to Kashmir drawn by its beauty.Travel for empire building and pilgrimage was a regular feature.The Grand Tour From the early seventeenth century, a new form of tourism was developed as a direct outcome of the Renaissance. Under the reign of Elizabeth 1, young men seeking positions at court were encouraged to travel to continent to finish their education. Later, it became customary for education of gentleman to be completed by a ‘Grand Tour’ accompanied by a tutor and lasting for three or more years. While ostensibly educational, the pleasure seeking men travelled to enjoy life and culture of Paris, Venice or Florence. By the end of eighteenth century, the custom had become institutionalised in the gentry. Gradually pleasure travel displaced educational travel. The advent of Napoleonic wars inhibited travel for around 30 years and led to the decline of the custom of the Grand Tour.The development of the spasThe spas grew in popularity in the seventeenth century in Britain and a little later in the European Continent as awareness about the therapeutic qualities of mineral water increased. Taking the cure in the spa rapidly acquired the nature of a status symbol. The resorts changed in character as pleasure became the motivation of visits. They became an important centre of social life for the high society.In the nineteenth century they were gradually replaced by the seaside resort.The sun, sand and sea resortsThe sea water became associated with health benefits. The earliest visitors therefore drank it and did not bathe in it. By the early eighteenth century, small fishing resorts sprung up in England for visitors who drank and immersed themselves in sea water. With the overcrowding of inland spas, the new sea side resorts grew in popularity. The introduction of steamboat services in 19th century introduced more resorts in the circuit. The seaside resort gradually became a social meeting point Role of the industrial revolution in promoting travel in the west The rapid urbanisation due to industrialisation led to mass immigration in cities. These people were lured into travel to escape their environment to places of natural beauty, often to the countryside they had come from change of routine from a physically and psychologically stressful jobs to a leisurely pace in countryside.Highlights of travel in the nineteenth century ·        Advent of railway initially catalysed business travel and later leisure travel. Gradually special trains were chartered to only take leisure travel to their destinations.·        Package tours organised by entrepreneurs such as Thomas Cook.·        The European countries indulged in a lot of business travel often to their colonies to buy raw material and sell finished goods.·        The invention of photography acted as a status-enhancing tool and promoted overseas travel.·        The formation of first hotel chains; pioneered by the railway companies who established great railway terminus hotels.·        Seaside resorts began to develop different images as for day-trippers, elite, for gambling.·        Other types of destinations-ski resorts, hill stations, mountaineering spots etc.·        The technological development in steamships promoted travel between North America and Europe.·        The Suez Canal opened direct sea routes to India and the Far East.·        The cult of the guidebook followed the development of photography.  Tourism in the Twentieth Century The First World War gave first hand experience of countries and aroused a sense of curiosity about international travel among less well off sector for the first time. The large scale of migration to the US meant a lot of travel across the Atlantic. Private motoring began to encourage domestic travel in Europe and the west.  The sea side resort became annual family holiday destination in Britain and increased in popularity in other countries of the west. Hotels proliferated in these destinations.The birth of air travel and after The wars increased interest in international travel. This interest was given the shape of mass tourism by the aviation industry. The surplus of aircraft and growth of private airlines aided the expansion of air travel. The aircraft had become comfortable, faster and steadily cheaper for overseas travel. With the introduction of Boeing 707 jet in 1958, the age of air travel for the masses had arrived. The beginning of chartered flights boosted the package tour market and led to the establishment of organised mass tourism. The Boeing 747, a 400 seat craft, brought the cost of travel down sharply. The seaside resorts in the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Caribbean were the initial hot spots of mass tourism.A corresponding growth in hotel industry led to the establishment of world-wide chains. Tourism also began to diversify as people began to flock alternative destinations in the 70s. Nepal and India received a throng of tourists lured by Hare Krishna movement and transcendental meditation. The beginning of individual travel in a significant volume only occurred in the 80s. Air travel also led to a continuous growth in business travel especially with the emergence of the MNCs.